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Bjurböle. 15,5g

In March 12, 1899 at 22:30 local time a fireball was seen in Finland. The next dat a 3-4 meters wide hole was seen on a frozen shore. A 330 kg single stone had fallen through sea-ice, penetrating a 40 cm thick ice sheet, 50 cm of water and 8 meters of mud and clay. It broke into fragments with one large fragment of 80 kg and many smaller pieces. People tried to find the meteorite themselves because they knew the exact point where it was located but at the end they had to build a waterproof wooden well out of wooden beams to dry out the sea water and mud. This did not succeed completely, but in the end a diver was able to find the meteorite and pulled the pieces up to the ice. The recovered portions of the meteorite are unusually friable and consist primarily of chondrules and metal grains. Bjurböle has received less attention than some of the even less equilibrated type 3.0—3.9 unequilibrated ordinary chondrites, but a careful reading of the literature reveals a surprising variety of textures, phases, and enigmas. Bjurböle is the most massive of those 20 meteorites classified exactly as ‘L/LL4’ chondrites and is one of only three witnessed L/LL4 chondrite falls listed by The Meteoritical Bulletin Database (January 2016).

Bjurböle. 15,5g. Collection

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