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Bjurböle. 15,5g

Bjurböle. 15,5g. Collection

In March 12, 1899 at 22:30 local time a fireball was seen in Finland. The next dat a 3-4 meters wide hole was seen on a frozen shore. A 330 kg single stone had fallen through sea-ice, penetrating a 40 cm thick ice sheet, 50 cm of water and 8 meters of mud and clay. It broke into fragments with one large fragment of 80 kg and many smaller pieces. People tried to find the meteorite themselves because they knew the exact point where it was located but at the end they had to build a waterproof wooden well out of wooden beams to dry out the sea water and mud. This did not succeed completely, but in the end a diver was able to find the meteorite and pulled the pieces up to the ice. The recovered portions of the meteorite are unusually friable and consist primarily of chondrules and metal grains. Bjurböle has received less attention than some of the even less equilibrated type 3.0—3.9 unequilibrated ordinary chondrites, but a careful reading of the literature reveals a surprising variety of textures, phases, and enigmas. Bjurböle is the most massive of those 20 meteorites classified exactly as ‘L/LL4’ chondrites and is one of only three witnessed L/LL4 chondrite falls listed by The Meteoritical Bulletin Database (January 2016).

Bjurböle. 15,5g. Collection

Bassikounou. 426g

Bassikounou. 426g. Collection

A fireball was witnessed at 04:00 local time in Bassikounou, a remote area in Hodh Ech Chargui, Mauritania. No records of the direction of movement were recorded. A single stone of 3165 gram was found by A. Salem El Moichine, a local resident, on the same day at 13:00, 11 km southeast of Bassikounou. The sample for classification was provided to NMBE by M. Ould Mounir, Nouakchott, who obtained it from his cousin who recovered the meteorite. Other specimens were found later on. These finds defined a 8 km long strewnfield. The total recovered mass was 46 kg. It is classified as an H5 chondrite. This specimen is 100% exquisite fusion crust and some lipping that can be seen in the first picture.

Bassikounou. 426g. Collection
Bassikounou. 426g. Collection

Brahin. 435g

Brahin. 435g. Collection

Brahin was first found in 1807 by two farmers in the south of Belarus. It is just a few kilometers away of Chernobyl and this event in 1986 contaminated the strewnfield of the Brahin meteorite. Fortunately only the first cm of soil are contaminated and not the meteorites.

Brahin. 435g. Collection
Brahin. 435g. Collection

Chergach. 289g

Chergach. 289g. Collection

In July 2007 african nomads reported in Mali a smoke cloud and some detonations but no fireball was seen. This meteorite fall happened on the 2nd or 3rd of July but exact day is undetermined. In autumn and winter of the same year many fragments were finally found with a total known weight of about 100 kilograms. This meteorite is classified as a chondrite H5, S3, W0. 

Chergach. 289g. Collection
Chergach. 289g. Collection

Deport. 267g

Deport. 267g. Collection

The Deport meteorite was found in Red River County, Texas (USA) in 1926. It is an important old meteorite and one of the very first meteorites that Oscar Monnig cataloged for his collection. Deport is classified as an Iron, Coarse Octahedrite (IAB). As an iron meteorite, it probably comes from the core of asteroids that were destroyed by impacts with other bodies. It is an alloy of iron-nickel mainly although it contains other trace elements. This specimen is among the very first meteorites that Oscar Monnig cataloged for his collection. It was labeled by having a flat spot ground into them and then metal punches were used to apply their catalog number (see the 1AS code). These all were labeled with a number for the locality (number 1 in this case for Deport – the first locality entered into Monnig’s collection) followed by a letter for the order in which the specimen was cataloged starting with the letter A. The curators at Texas Christian University had no idea that Monnig had ever used such a system of labeling until these pieces were discovered in a batch of what were supposed to be Odessa specimens. Luckily they were recognized.

Deport. 267g. Collection
Deport. 267g. Collection

Tunguska wood plate. 30g

Tunguska wood plate. 30g. Collection

The Tunguska event is a massive explosion that occurred on the morning of June 30, 1908 at around 07:17 local time in a remote region approximately 750 km northwest of Lake Baikal. Natives and Russian settlers in the hills northwest of Lake Baikal observed a column of bluish light, nearly as bright as the sun moving across the sky. About ten minutes later, there was a sound similar to artillery fire. The sounds were accompanied by a shock wave that knocked people off their feet, broke windows and some reports suggest that at least three people may have died in the event. It also flattened an estimated 80 million trees over an area of 2,150 km2 (830 sq mi) of forest. The explosion is generally attributed to the air burst (not impact itself) of a meteoroid about 100 meters in diameter that exploded at an altitude of 5 to 10 kilometres (3 to 6 miles). Due to the remoteness of the area, only a few expeditions reached the site. One of them was organized by the University of Bologna in 1991, when this wood plate was taken.

Tunguska wood plate. 30g. Collection

Sikhote Alin, lot. 477g

Sikhote Alin, lot. 477g. Collection

The Sikhote Alin meteorite is one of the biggest meteorite falls in recorded history. It was felt over 300km away with a bolide that the witnesses describe as brighter than the Sun. It crossed the atmosphere at 14km/s above the Sikhote Alin mountains. The fall happened in Russian fast East, close the the China border at 10:38 h local time the 12 February 1947. Sikhote Alin fragmented in its descent until the pressure of the atmosphere was so high that it exploded. The event left mainly 2 types of meteorites, one with smooth surfaces due to the higher time being ablated and one with intricate shapes due to the explosion. All these specimens are oriented and some have flow lines. They have been individually selected among many kilos of material.

Sikhote Alin, lot. 477g. Collection
Sikhote Alin, lot. 477g. Collection

Zag. 123g

Zag. 123g. Collection

On August 4th or 5th 1998, a meteorite fall was witnessed on a mountain near of Zag, Morocco, in the border with Western Sahara. Around 175 kg were found and subsequently sold by locals. Zag is an ordinary chondrite H3-6 and regolith breccia.

Zag. 123g. Collection
Zag. 123g. Collection

Henbury. 3388g

Henbury. 3388g. Collection

The natives have a legend that the craters were formed during a fiery explosion; they call the place “Chindu chinna waru chingi yabu” which means “Sun walk fire devil rock”. It indicates that the theory that Henbury is a witnessed fall is more thank likely. Moreover, it has been estimated that this iron has been on Earth for approximately 4200 years. Due to its characteristics it is classified as a IIIAB iron meteorite. The Henbury meteorite was found in Australia in 1931 for the first time by occidentals. The crater field is situated 11 km west-southwest of Henbury Cattle Station in the heart of arid Central Australia. It is known to have caused 13 to 14 craters ranging from 7 to 180 meters (23 to 591 ft) in diameter and up to 15 meters (49 ft) in depth. Shortly after the discovery, large quantities of this meteorite were removed from the area, and over the years the site has been almost completely cleaned. As a result, most of the area has been closed by the government and collecting is forbidden now.

Henbury. 3388g. Collection
Henbury. 3388g. Collection

Wiluna. 108g

Wiluna. 108g. Collection

On September 2, 1967 at 10:46 p.m. local time a large meteorite shower fell East of Wiluna in an elliptical area 5 x 3 kilometres. It is estimated that 500 to 1000 stones hit the ground. The Western Australian Museum has 480 stones and others are in private hands. It is classified as an H5 chondrite meteorite. This specimen was recovered during the search organized by the Western Australia Museum shortly after the fall. The specimen bears the painted collection number 12934 137 which indicates the 137st individual collected from the Wiluna meteorite fall.

Wiluna. 108g. Collection
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