en English
en English

Sikhote Alin. 4082g

Sikhote Alin. 4082g. Collection

This meteorite is one of the biggest meteorite falls in recorded history. It was felt over 300km away with a bolide that the witnesses describe as brighter than the Sun. It crossed the atmosphere at 14km/s above the Sikhote Alin mountains. The fall happened in Russian fast East, close the the China border at 10:38 h local time the 12 February 1947. Sikhote Alin fragmented in its descent until the pressure of the atmosphere was so high that it exploded. The event left mainly 2 types of meteorites, one with smooth surfaces due to the higher time being ablated and one with intricate shapes due to the explosion. This specimen comes from the first fragmentation of the meteor.

Sikhote Alin. 4082g. Collection

NWA 13519, R chondrite. 612g

NWA 13519, R chondrite. 612g. Collection

Rumuruti chondrites (also known as R chondrites) are a very rare type of chondrites. Less than 0,5% of chondrites fall into this classification. They differ from ordinary chondrites mainly in having most of the metal in the form of sulfides, they are more oxidized and contain little metallic Iron and Nickel. Apparently, R chondrites come from an asteroid’s regolith (surface with loose solid materials). This piece is the main mass of NWA 13519.

NWA 13519, R chondrite. 612g. Collection

Sericho. 70kg

Sericho. 70kg. Collection

In 2016, two brothers were searching for their camels and came across several large, dense stones west of the village of Habaswein and south of Sericho, Kenya. There are no rocks in this area, so they decided they were meteorites. They spent several weeks collecting them with engine hoists and moving them to their homes in Habaswein. Though recognized as meteorites in 2016, the masses had been known to camel-herders for decades. One village elder said that as a child, he and his brothers would play on top of the stones.

Sericho. 70kg. Collection
Sericho. 70kg. Collection
×