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Chelyabinsk. 279g

Chelyabinsk. 279g. Collection

The Chelyabinsk meteorite is one of the most famous meteorites due to the variety of recordings of the fall available. It is estimated than thousands of people were injured due to the meteor’s shock wave that broke many windows and roofs of houses and factories in the city of Chelyabinsk, Russia, on February 15, 2013 at 09:20 local time. 

Chelyabinsk. 279g. Collection

Libyan Desert Glass, black. 82g

Libyan Desert Glass, black. 82g. Collection

Formed by a massive impact near the Libyan border with Egypt 26 million years ago, this impactite is one of the most sought after type. As a result of the heat and pressure of the impact event, desert sands were melted and formed an impact glass in a a wide range of shapes and colors from yellowish-white to yellow and black-yellow. Ancient Egyptians already knew about these rocks, and they picked them up and used them to make tools and jewelry for the Pharaohs, for example, for the famous Tutankhamun’s pendant with Wadjet. This piece has a rare black color and a natural hole.

Libyan Desert Glass, black. 82g. Collection
Libyan Desert Glass, black. 82g. Collection

Indochinite with flow lines. 92g

Indochinite with flow lines. 92g. Collection

Indochinites were ejected into the Earth’s upper atmosphere by a huge meteorite impact 788.000 years ago in the Gulf of Tonkin (Vietnam). The steam jets cooled down in the higher atmosphere and condensed to form this type of glass. The pieces rained down hundreds and thousands of kilometers away from the impact, in direction South-East, reaching Philippines and even Australia. They have diverse shapes and a characteristic black color. This “patty” indochinite has amazing flow lines radiating from the center of both faces.

Indochinite with flow lines. 92g. Collection
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